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the release of the lockerbie bomber. what the u.s. asked scotland to do with the man who killed almost 200 americans. and they were planning their daughter's funeral when suddenly -- >> -- we made a mistake. abby is alive. >> we're still in shock. >> shepard: tonight, one family's miracle leaves another in mourning. first this monday night 92,000 documents on the war in afghanistan. the bottom line? we're not winning. the taliban are stronger than they have been since 2001. and pakistan? evidence that pakistan's intelligence agency is helping the enemy. the u.s. government gives pakistan more than $1 billion a year to help fight the taliban. and, instead, documentation of the pakistani government actually working with the militants who were trying to kill u.s. forces in afghanistan. the classified documents posted on the web site wiki leaks. its founder a few weeks ago gave them to newspapers including the "new york times" so that they could analyze the files before they were posted. the "new york times" reports the documents reveal among other things pakistan let members of the spy servic
>>> next on msnbc sunday. the search -- nato forces go looking for two u.s. sailors missing in afghanistan since friday. >>> going to extremes -- temperatures are soaring and flood waters are raging. live reports coming up. >>> coming and going -- crews return to the gulf as the bp guy may get the heeve-ho. president obama receives a young girl's letter and inspires her to lead the fight against bullying. let's check out what's happening right now. we have developing news from the war front this morning. two american sailors are missing in afghanistan. a taliban spokesman said one was taken in a fire fight, the other taken by militants. what's the latest, jim? >> the latest report from afghanistan now from afghan officials who claim that the u.s. military has recovered the body of one of the missing americans. but u.s. military officials cannot confirm that. there's still a lot of confusion out there about what exactly happened. all we know is the two americans went missing on friday when they were driving from one compound to another. they're inside kabul. they ended up som
's u.s. ambassador about the airliner crash that killed 152 people, and she examines u.s./pakistani relations after the leak of thousands of secret military documents. >> ifill: we ask environmental engineer nancy kinner to track what's happened to the oil in the water. 100 days after the gulf disaster. >> lehrer: and spencer michels tells the story of a one-man mission to help clean up the oil in louisiana. >> a private individual has taken it upon himself to try to protect the barrier islands in the gulf of mexico. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that zero emission technologies to breathing a little easier, while taking 4.6 million truckloads off the road every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
, she wanted to talk to the president. today shirley sherrod, fired by the u.s.d.a., got the call and another apology. are illegal immigrants raising the crime rate? some argue yes; others no. we'll give you the facts. and happy thursday-- or is it. tracking the mood of america tweet by tweet. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. a tropical storm has just formed in the caribbean and by saturday it could be churning through the site of the massive oil spill in the gulf of mexico, disrupting the cleanup for days, even weeks. some cleanup boats were sent back to port today. the large oil recovery ships may follow. tropical storm bonnie is north of cuba right now, and over the next few days it's projected to pass through the florida keys and then into the gulf. even so, federal officials said today they will keep the cap on that ruptured well. and the white house said the president, who's been urging americans to visit the gulf's still-open beaches, will take the f
and this will go down to the wire. most powerful democrat in the u.s. senate has a lot to worry about in the next hundred days. >> gregg: all right. carl cameron, carl, stay with us it's a little tricky. >> blackjack, actually. >> gregg: we're streaming nevada events. check it out at 10:00 brian wilson will host a one hour special from america's election headquarters, bringing you al franken bringing closing remarks at the event. >> a political show down in the nation's capitol. president obama and gop taking shots at one another, criticizing jock creation proposals. molly henneberg is live from d.c. with the details. molly, i understand the president says the u.s. is finally headed in the right direction with the economy so we ask, what specifically did he mean? >> well he named or he listed a couple of things that his administration has done, to quote, get us out of this recession including new regulations on the financial industry, more money for the clean energy sector and tax cuts for working families. he criticized john boehner saying gop wants to repeal the health care law and keep tax cut
and just met with general petraeus and other members in the area of kabul. this is very odd for two u.s. service members to go missing and in fact for them to just leave their base in kabul in a separate vehicle without other vehicles following them. many of us trying to figure out answers to these questions that baffled many within the material as well as journalists and as well as the civilian community. >> two soldiers left their base and went missing, and now government officials telling us one is dead and the other is being held by the taliban. atia, a lot of people might be wondering about the other five? there was a separate incident where five were killed. you also spoke about a taliban spokesperson calling you. that might sound strange to some people here in the u.s., but i want you to address the fact that the taliban, that the u.s. fighting there and does have a heck of a pr infrastructure there, and if can you address that for the viewers, and do we note condition of the second soldier now being held? >> reporter: well, when we talk about the condition of the second soldier,
case has put a spotlight on the u.s.d.a.'s long history of discrimination against black farmers. more about that now from national correspondent dean reynolds. >> reporter: willie adams '60-acre georgia farm has been in his family since 1938 and he wants to hold on to its red clay and green pastures for generations to come. but the fight to keep it is increasingly stressful. >> high blood pressure, almost a heart attack. (laughs) oh, yeah. a lot of stress. >> reporter: adams is one of a dwindling number of african american farmers, some 33,000 in all. >> we want equal justice! >> reporter: they're hoping congress will at last end decades of discrimination against them and appropriate the $1.25 billion they and their an ancestors won in a settlement with the department of agriculture in february. a court found the farmers had been systematically denied aid solely because they were black. loans, grants, and subsidies that white farmers received. willie adams says u.s.d.a. officials always claimed to him and other blacks that they lacked the funding. but you saw that they did have funds
's an interesting scene near phoenix. >> reporter: arizona's governor predicts a long battle to the u.s. supreme court. >> we are disappointed but we did what we wanted. we got the injunction. i will still means, as you well know that the lawsuit will continue to move forward and the merits of case will be heard. >> reporter: but, first the injunction against the key provisions come to the 9th circuit court of appeal, its hub in san francisco, its judges spread across several states. >> that's biggest circuit in the country by far. so we have a lot of action out on the west coast. it's not surprising that the 9th circuit is as controversial as it is. >> reporter: historically considered a level-leaning court, that's gradually eased and in the first appeal stage, only three judges hear arguments. >> its all depends on who the three judges are. they are not short on some very conservative judges. their ruling can be appealed to an 11-judge panel. most believe that arizona has an uphill fight. >> a state statute that enters into congress' area and interference with foreign policy of the united stat
in u.s. military spending. they write this in a joint article. "we may not agree on what to do with the estimated $1 trillion in savings, but we do agree that nothing -- we do agree that nothing either of us cares diply about will be possible if we do not begin to face this issue now." representatives frank and paul are joining us together from their respective states. congressman, thanks very much for coming in. how did you guys team up to call for this massive cut in u.s. military spending? congressman paul? >> well, the two of us have talked about this over the years. barne was motivated to come to me and ask me about this, about setting up a commission to do the study. set out a program. and it's not going to happen tomorrow. it's a ten-year program. he asked me if i'd be interested in doing a little bit more work. i obviously agreed to do that. i've almost looking for an opportunity to bring progressive democrats together with conse e conservative libertarian types because there are places where we can agree. >> let's talk about the specifics you have in mind. congressman
they handed out huge bonuses and with citigroup being the biggest offenders since they haven't paid the u.s. taxpayer back, but the pay master may be leaving out one big important piece of information, that according to fox business network's stuart varney. everybody gets very riled up about this. there's a lot to understand here, though, and i know you want to lay out some of that for us. >> number one, the pay czar, he cannot claw back the money. he can ask for it back. does not have the legal authority to take it back. point number two, 11 of the 17 banks which paid these bonuses actually repaid all of the bailout money in full with interest and with profit to the taxpayer. he did not call them obscene or huge bonuses, he called them ill advised and unmerited, and some of these bonuses may have had to have been paid because of the contractual obligations to the executives involved. number ', you're right, citi may well have been the biggest offender because of one big particular earning trader. number four, are we absolutely sure that this is not a political attack on the banking industr
of the u.s. but there they were, those russian spies discovered living in america, having blended into american society. tonight they are en route out of here and they are part of a spy swap, ten of them being exchanged for people in russia accused of spying for the u.s. we start off tonight with our justice correspondent pete williams in our washington newsroom. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, there's never been anything quite like this. from arrest to guilty plea to expulsion from the country in just 11 days. it's the legal system driven to hyper speed by a u.s. desire to improve relations with russia. assembled quickly in a federal courthouse in new york city, all ten admitted that while they pretended to be just the folks next door, they were actually sent here to be secret agents for russia. one by one, they spoke their true russian names, then pleaded guilty to being unregistered foreign agents. the judge accepted their pleas and sentenced them to time serves -- less than two weeks, freeing the government to send them to russia in a cold war-style prisoner exchanged,
, of the ford motor company. in an average week in the u.s., thousands of babies are born prematurely and develop lifelong health problems or disabilities. that is why thousands of families and business leaders will once again join together to support the march of dimes in our nation's oldest walk fundraiser, the march for babies. i am proud to be one of the national co-chairs for the 2010 march for babies. together with the u.a.w., we are committed to raising awareness and funding from volunteers like you. your funds support research and community programs to ensure that someday, all babies will be born healthier and lead happier lives. volunteers enabled the march of dimes to conquer polio. we are confident that, with your help, we can walk together toward a healthier future for our nation's babies and have fun. please join us. register today at marchforbabies.org. >>> afghan anxiety. the desperate search for missing sailors and a huge leak of classified information from the battle front. >>> then, chief change. bp's top executive, tony hey ward, heads out while the replacement move
. in afghanistan, the new u.s. commander, general david petraeus is on the ground and getting right to work. in iraq, a fourth of july weekend surprise for u.s. troops. vice president joe biden and his wife are in baghdad in an unannounced visit. we'll have a live report in just about a minute from now. >>> but first t latest on the gulf oil disaster. bad news for south florida. a few government report warns that there is a good chance that bp's spilled oil will reach south florida within 20 miles of the beaches there in the florida keys, miami and ft. lauderdale in the next few months. and one more loss to report in the gulf. tourism dollars. cnn's reynolds wolf is in gulf shores, alabama. there are a have you stragglers on the beach. but hardly anyone would want to get into the water. how is this hurting this coastal community? >> reporter: a lot of people, one of the first things they want to do is head out in that water which is usually a beautiful aquamarine. but unfortunately, they can't do that. let's be honest about this, the situation could be like this, virtually empty. but instea
you say? the u.s. national debt now at unsustainable levels. even the cbo says that. one democrat is suggesting a brand new plan. it's a new transaction tax that would impose a 1 percent fee on every single solitary financial transaction except for stocks. so whether you buy a couple of coffee or a brand new car, you're going to pay a little extra to the u.s. government, and even taking your own money out of your own bank account at an atm could cost you, that's right, 1 percent more under this new law. martha: this may sound strikingly similar to the vat tax used in england and other countries and it cost them a lot of money. is that what's coming here? stuart varney joins us, he's the anchor of varney & company on the fox business network. stuart, welcome, good to have you here. this idea was launched by a democratic congressman from pennsylvania and written about by lanny davis in an editorial. lanny davis worked wither skin bowles in the clinton administration. it raises the question are we starting to get the form from this debt commission, are they starting to float out ther
to fight the lawsuit. >> shepard: okay. trace gallagher in los angeles. thank you. the u.s. is responding to new allegations from the iranian nuclear scientist to claims he was paid -- no, he claims the c.i.a. paid him millions of dollars in exchange for intelligence on iran's atomic program. angelina jolie plays a spy but premiere? "studio b" continues in 90 seconds. black keeping your house smelling like it should. purina tidy cats scoop. keep your home smelling like home. [ but aleve can last 12 hours. tylenol 8 hour lasts 8 hours. and aleve was proven to work better on pain than tylenol 8 hour. so why am i still thinking about this? how are you? good, how are you? [ male announcer ] aleve. proven better on pain. >> 13 minutes past the hour. at least ten people are dead after a suspected u.s. drone attack in part of pakistan said to be infested with militants. thee missiles struck in north waziristan along the border is pakistan, a place where osama bin laden may be hiding. a few hundred miles to the north and east a suicide bomber killed five people. nearly 60 were injured. the swat v
the audience the u.s. was in the nine-year-old war to win. joining me from kabul, senator john mccain. he's leading a dellication to afghanistan. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. good to be with you. >> general petraeus assumed command in afghanistan earlier today, and here is how he defined a critical moment in the fight. >> we're engaged in a contest of will. our enemies are doing all they can to undermine the confidence of the afghan people. in so doing, they're killing and maiming innocent civilians on a daily basis. no tactic is beneath the insurgents. >> a lot of americans are wondering after nine years of war, the taliban has the momentum in this fight. >> well, i'm not sure that the taliban have the momentum right now, jake. the taliban obviously are entrenched in places and parts of the outskirts of kandahar, areas where they're still in control. there has been some progress. it's been hard fought and with great sacrifice. but there's no doubt that we spent a lot of time and effort, american blood and treasure on iraq and now is the time for us to continue this mission and
is going badly. so what do the documents actually say? "the new york times" was the only u.s. paper to publish the store prip here's my cyst of some of the most surprising items in this report. number one, it reports high-ranking members of the pakistani spy agency met with taliban officials and actually helped organize attacks against americans. pakistan, that's supposed to be our ally, right? number two. the situation on the ground is more grim than what we've been hearing from washington. number three, the taliban is better armed than we've been led to believe. in fact, the "times" reports they've actually been using heat-seeking missiles against allied aircraft, weapons used, as you recall, by the mujahidin against the soviets when they kicked their butts. four, the "times" reports on equipment shortages, specifically american vehicles. and five, a strain between american forces and their afghan counterparts. our next guest spent a lot of time in afghanistan since 9/11. he's currently part of a company that's working over there. he's also running as a republican for senate in th
and are holding the other one hostage. the u.s. has not confirmed that report or said why the servicemen put themselves in harm's way. >>> the dead toll has risen to 19 after a stampede at a german music festival. organizers of the so-called love parade face some tough questions about why hundreds of thousands of people were funneled through a single highway underpass into the site. witnesses described a desperate scene there as people literally piled up on each other or scrambled over others who had fallen. >>> it is revolutionary day in cuba, and former president fidel castro has made another public appearance. castro was seen outside havana for the first time since giving up power four years ago. the 84-year-old wore an olive-green shirt that looked like the military uniform he wore for decades. lately he has been seen in track suits. >>> flood damage from this weekend's disastrous dam break in eastern iowa is estimated to be well into the millions, and the threat from surging water is not over yet. the maquoketa river is expected to crest today at a record high of more than 32 feet. here
is convicted. both suspects are due in court next week. >>> >>> the u.s. economy had the weakest growth in almost a year. the commerce department said the gross domestic product grew 2.4% in april, may and june. that is down from 3.7% revised number. weaker consumer spending and less growth from companies rebuilding inventories are seen as the main factor for the drop in growth. >>> the transit labor dispute is heading to court today. the judge may decide whether or not to overturn a contract that was imposed on transit employees. the contract changed work rules and shifted hours. that angered a lot of bus drivers who have been accused of staging a sickout. they say they need concessions from the union to reduce the budget deficit. they say if the judge reinstates the old contracts, all weekend transit service could be eliminated. >>> all right. time is 7:08. >>> yesterday we had call train delays. do we have them today. >> we do furtherly. we have a train that's been cancelled. i'm looking at the e-mail sent from cal train. let me pull this up here. it is train 309. it has been cancell
is needed to stop illegals and smugglers from flooding across the u.s./mexico border. but as bill whitaker reports, the border region is not the lawless territory many believe it is. >> the border is more secure now than it's ever been. >> reporter: murder, burglaries, rape, the major crimes, up or down on the border? >> they're down. >> reporter: down? >> violence in the cities is down. >> reporter: according to the fbi, that's true across the southern border this decade. in san diego, violent crime is down 17%. in phoenix, down 10%. el paso, texas, one of the safest cities in the u.s., violent crime down 36%. and it sits right across from juarez, mexico, one of the deadliest cities on earth. west along the border in nogales, arizona -- >> this is a very safe environment. >> reporter: chris, a third generation produce distributor says it's as safe as 20 years ago. one reason? >> we're definitely seeing more border patrol over the last few years. >> reporter: border patrol chief is in charge of the 262-mile tucson sector that covers nogales. 338 agents patrol today, up from a decade ago. w
to drive it home. i wish you well as u.s. junior jobs. >> my apologies again -- i wish you well as you assume your jobs. >> my apologies again. we please all stand? will you swear that the testimony you're about to give the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth? do agree to testify before the united states senate? i thank all three of you. let me start with you dr. yellen. you have any family members here that you would like to recognize? >> [inaudible] >> and you? >> [unintelligible] >> dr. raskin? >> [unintelligible] >> very smart bringing in those kinetic events -- connected -- ans.ecte-- connecticut's i hope you have not mention anyone. [laughter] -- i hope you have not forgotten to mention anyone. [laughter] we will begin with you dr. yellen. normally, i ask that the people try to restrain their remarks to five minutes a piece. but having read your statements, i would urge you to speak five minutes apiece. there were very short perio. for the purposes of the record, let me say that any statements that members of this committee will have will be added to the record. any
] >> juliet: tonight a deadly fight over the u.s. border make u.s. changing the way they fight the drug war. >> what does it mean? >> 160 miles an hour, my best time. >> its sport dominated by men. now nascar is looking for more women. laura ingle has got what it takes to keep up with the pros. >> juliet: the government is setting a critical deadline for the disaster in the gulf. evaluation of a new cap containing the oil leak will continue outlaw tomorrow. it's not clear what will happen next. the latest decision takes it beyond the 48 trial period that bp capped the oil well. a live look on the gulf floor. we've seen this picture nearly 52 hours, they are saying, quote there is no evidence of ruptures of the pipes or the ocean floor. hundreds of miles away in houston, they are monitoring the data coming in. perhaps the most important piece the pressure on the containment cap. ideal reading is 7500 pounds per square inch or psi. thad allen is saying that number would make no potential for any leaks. right now the psi is in the vicinity of 6745 and climbing. higher the pressure the greater
for the worst disaster in u.s. oil history, posting a record $17 billion loss, in only three months' time. wow, that is not easy to do. now it will sell some assets to cover cost and obligations in the gulf which are plenty. stuart varney, stuart, good morning to you, what are they going to sell? >> they're going to sell smaller, older oil fields to the value of $30 billion. that's how much money they're going to need to bring in to stop paying for the cleanup. so bp the company is the obvious financial loser at first glance. look deeper, the u.k. government is also a big loser, it will take in about $10 billion less in tax from bp over the next four years. shareholders, they're also losers here, there are going to be no dividend payments at leastum next year. now, tony hayward, you could obviously say he's a loser in the sense he's lost his job and certainly his reputation but he leaves financially in tact. he will take with him to russia is a job, a -- 1 million pounds, $1.6 million in salary, his pension fund of roughly 17, $18 million will be available to him in full in two years, when he
openly. >> we don't see police. there's no police around here. >> reporter: a u.s. district court judge agreed with the obama administration that the arizona law was unconstitutional on its face. arizona filed an appeal to the ninth circuit court of appeals. the legal controversy over sp 1070 will likely be decided in the supreme court. brad wheelis, abc news. >>> authorities say the federal judge in the case has been getting threats over her controversial ruling. and they are taking them all seriously. the u.s. marshal spokesman says judge susan bolton, has received thousands of phone calls and e-mails since her preliminary injunction this week. the threats are all being investigated. >>> on capitol hill, the house ethics committee is preparing to try new york congressman charles rangel for a series of ethics violations. the charges against the democrat have now been made public after a two-year investigation. jonathan karl has the story. >> reporter: the ethics committee report on rangel is detailed. and it is scathe. it accuses him of, quote, a pattern of disregard for the laws of th
rpassed vietnam as the longest military campaign in u.s. history. republican richard lugar demands more clarity about the administration's direction. also tributes were being paid to three british soldiers who also lost their lives in violent attacks, kill the by a rogue afghan soldier who has since gone on the run. >> they've got to reassure us they're doing everything they can to minimize it happening again. but for those who it has happened to in that patrol base, this will have been a horrific event. >> as the british casualties also continue to climb, it is becoming increasingly difficult to defend the british presence in afghanistan. also, this morning afghan president hamid karzai endorsed a u.s. plan to set up local police forces to help afghan villagers protect themselves. >> thanks to sonia gallego in london. >>> officers from north korea and the american-led united nations force that helps protect south korea came face to face this morning. on the agenda was the sinking of that south korean navy ship back in march. 46 south korean sailors were killed in that incident. th
of the u.s. mission in london to a scottish official that indicates the u.s. was notified about scotland's plans to release the libyan intelligence agent blamed for the pan am bombing, though it indicates u.s. permission was ago. magra he was israel dollars based on the assessment the cancer left him only three months to live. the memo makes clear the u.s. was released but said if magra he would be released, the u.s. referred him be released in scotland and turn over to a libyan prison. mag heie is still alive, a doctor says he could be around ten more years. two hundred seventy people died in the pan am bombing, most americans, jenna. jenna: bring us back to the date of that release, wendell. why would the u.s. not support a prisoner transfer to libya? >> well, it may be the u.s. certainly has no confidence in the libyan judicial system and it may than they didn't want to set a precedent of prisoner transfer with that country. remember, libya is the country that convicted 5bu 4ru6789 -- 3w-6789 u luvment garian nursing and a doctor to death for purposefully injecting 400 children with t
abuse in the u.s. military. documents will be posted on wiki leaks within weeks. >> gregg: do we have any idea who gave the documents to wiki leaks? >> they seem to be focusing on a analyst bradley manning but he has not an suspect in the case. he was however arrested in may that o charges that he released aerial cockpit videos of a 2000 fire fight in baghdad. manning was moved from a field jail to a brig in virginia where he may face trial. >> gregg: talk to us about the impact of these leaks? >> defense officials say they put u.s. soldiers at risk as well as afghan families. that the state department warning that these leaks may damage u.s. intelligence inside and outside of afghanistan. here is more. >> you dump out tens of thousands of documents. nmgs service all over the world will be looking over them and see what they can glean of how we gain information. this can have a national security impact. >> reporter: he says he offered the white house the documents before they were posted to make sure no innocent people were identified but they didn't respond. a spokesperson for obama
government debt or trying to spark new lending to business. for a closer look, greg ip, u.s. economics editor of "the economist" magazine. greg, welcome. corporate earnings, they were higher than expected. what happened? why? >> well, the story of the last few months is that corporations have actually been reporting earnings that are better than analysts have expected but often the market has not taken that well. because when you dig down you find that a lot of that improvement is because of cost-cutting. we know that employment has been weak. and one reason why is that companies, when they meet their sales targets are doing it by making their workers more productive rather than hiring more. the other thing especially true today with companies like caterpillar and ups is the strong sales are not in the u.s. you but if places like china and india. the bottom line is the market is doing well but that is not necessarily a great sign for the economy. over the last month, even though we had a good day today t only kind of like takes us back to where we were, you know, a few weeks ago. it's basical
. this continues, come august, it's going to be tiny town u.s.a. first, immigration showdown, the obama administration suing the state of arizona over the new and controversial immigration law. the administration contend the law is not constitutional. as you may know arizona passed a law requiring police officers who enforce other laws to question the suspect's legal status if the officer believes the person is in the country illegally. the white house has been critical of the law. the president called it misguided. but supporters claim arizona has no other choice and they argue the feds are not doing enough to secure the borders. trace gallagher is working the story from the west coast newsroom. what's the basis of this lawsuit? it's specific, right? >> yeah, it is. we have the newsroom working this, 25 a pages was the filing. basically it's the chicken and egg legal argument saying the federal government has a law on the books making it illegal to be in the country without documentation. they're citing the supremacy clause saying basically federal law trumps state law. there's nothing
response to questions today about the planned draw-down of u.s. troops in afghanistan next july. he previously predicted a lot of people moving out. those were his words by then. but says, that's not really a deadline. >> what i was talking about was, you have, we're going to have over 100,000 people there. >> more, right, if you include -- >> i'm just talking about americans, 140,000 people there. and there's going to be a draw-down of forces as we transition. there are 34 districts in afghanistan. and the plan is, as we train up the afghani, we're going to begin in august say okay, now you got this province, we no longer have to have american ornato forces in that province. there will be a transition. and really, what i was responding to was the idea that the president had been outmaneuvered. i was saying, make it clear. so it wasn't so much numbers i meant. it could be as few as a couple thousand troops. it could be more. but settle will be a transition. >> and as the vice president said, there are around 100,000 american troops in afghanistan. 39 have bell killed there this mont
. >> they have more skimmers in place now. they are using the assets available to the u.s. government as well as those offered by the foreign governments. i asked are we doing anything to open our arms to invitations made from the other countries? >> i was unimpressed with the answer. >> right now they don't have enough skimmers on board. there is no urgency. >> darrell issa accused obama administration publicizing facts and figures at odds with the reality on the ground and blurring the spill severity, asset in play and when they were deployed. >> he purports to address that somehow it took the command 70 days to accept international help. that is a myth that's been debunked hundreds of times. i stood up here and talked to you frankly and given you the numbers we have. > >> they acknowledge the own figures of government assistance are at odds with each other. >> the numbers i have that admiral allen deployed are looking for divergence. we'll provide the explanation. >> reporter: on youtube, they said the company is going above and beyond to meet the obligation. >> i know it doesn't feel that
, the first one is a phoenix police officer whose name is david salgado, a native-born u.s. citizen of mexican ancestry. his opposition to sb 1070 is based on several broad constitutional arguments. one is that the law violates the 14th amendment, which guarantees minorities full rights as u.s. citizens. the other claim is that the law conflicts with what's known as the supremacy clause of the constitution. he argue sths that it gives the federal government, not state and local police forces authority over immigration laws. he also says that the law is having a chilling effect on his first amendment rights to speak out against it. tj? >> well, casey, what does, i guess this also has to be kind of torn. because this is an officer of the law who wants to uphold the law, of course, but he's been asked to uphold a law that he doesn't quite frankly believe in. >> right, and officer salgado said he's in a dilemma and plans to not enforce the law because he believes it's unconstitutional. here's the dilemma, he said that could subject him to discipline from his employer, the phoenix police department
in the u.s. is it global warming? >>> and, want to win? a sharp shooter takes on a carnival game at the state fair. >>> good evening. arizona's immigration law is on hold. the protests are not. emboldened by a judge's rebuke of that law yesterday, hundreds of opponents of the crackdown took to the streets today. but the state's unyielding governor stood by the law and filed an appeal. barbara pinto is in phoenix tonight. she's been there all day, in the middle of the stormy showdown. >> reporter: protestors descended on phoenix, despite a judge's ruling to delay enforcement of most of the state's new crackdown on illegal immigrants. demonstrations started at dawn, hundreds of protesters, dozens of arrests, tempering flaring. tensions are running high outside this jail, where protesters have gathered and it's turned into a standoff, police trying to push their way out of the building. demonstrations were loud, disruptive, but mostly peaceful. >> joe arpaio has picked the easy targets, the day laborers. let's go after the real criminals and stop wasting our money. >> reporter: this
immigration law before it even kicks in. a u.s. soldier now facing charges. accused of leaking this classified video. and why is breaking up so hard to do? science might tell us. you really might be addicted to love after all. >>> you knew it was coming. the feds suing arizona. trying to stop its tough new immigration law. the law that among other things requires police to question people they think might be in the country illegally. it is supposed to kick in three weeks from tomorrow. justice department basically says hold on, arizona. you can't make your own immigration laws because that's washington's job. governor jan brewer says that's the problem. washington has not done its jobs and arizona is paying the price. >> we need the federal government to do their job. if they don't do it, arizona will. >> reporter: governor brewer says the doj is wasting taxpayer money fighting this law. that it should use the money to fight the violent mexican drug cartels that have bled over the border. doj's beef with the law might be constitutional but other critics say that it will encourage racial profil
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